Kilboy House

The project comprised the reconstruction of a three-storey period house as originally constructed on the site in 1780, following a fire that gutted a major part of the property in 2005, and a new build element.

Project Cost - £60m

Workforce – 75+

End Value – £150m est

Duration – 5 years

Status - Delivered

Kilboy House - County Tipperary

  • Kilboy House was built during the lifetime of the fifth Henry Prittie between 1743 and 1801, who later became the first Lord Dunalley. The property is situated in the civil parish of Kilmore, in the barony of Upper Ormond and in the village of Dolla five miles from Nenagh, County Tipperary. It was the most imposing of several substantial mansions enhanced by lawns and lakes, ornamental shrubs, and trees erected in northwest Tipperary during the last half of the eighteen-century.

    Built in stone, it stood three storeys high over a basement with a central feature of pediment and four giant Doric columns. It had a broad flight of steps to the front door, which opened onto a large square hall. The house had a very fine interior with good plasterwork and imperial staircase. Kilboy House was designed around 1771 by William Leeson and is described in The Vanishing Houses of Ireland as the most important house that Leeson designed.

    Kilboy House was featured in Country Life magazine (September 7, 2016 Issue) as “The greatest new house in Europe”. Kilboy House is noted as “An exceptional new house that captures the best of Irish architectural traditions, the finest modern craftsmanship available and the most up-to-date technology”
  • The project comprised the reconstruction of a three-storey period house as originally constructed on the site in 1780, following a fire that gutted a major part of the property in 2005, and a new build element. The major initial element was to renovate the spectacular entrance gateway, built around 1775, comprising advanced central round-arched carriage opening with portico, flanked by round-arched pedestrian entrances, in turn flanked by pilasters and roughly-coursed rubble limestone boundary walls. It features snecked rubble limestone walling, with cut limestone portico with scrolls, archivolts and imposts and dressed quoins and surrounds to pedestrian entrances.

    The finely-built stone gateway is of apparent architectural design and was executed by skilled crafts people. It presents an impressive entrance to the rebuilt Kilboy House and is a conspicuous landmark on the Dolla to Silvermines Road.

    Large elements of this project were for a new-build centric house in the classical tradition in Ireland, designed by Quinlan and Francis Terry, and built with a phenomenal degree of attention to detail. It is stated by highly credible sources that the stonemasonry work is among the finest in the world today.
  • The project timescale from commencement to completion took 5 years. During the project the trades and managerial workforce numbered in the hundreds, with on-site peaks reaching around 75 individuals. A substantial part of the hand-picked workforce specialised in stonemasonry due to the design brief and substantive stone works incorporated within the project.

    The estimated project cost prior to the commencement was set at £60m which was achieved at the completion of the site. Whilst no official valuation has been completed in recent years since the project was delivered, it is estimated within the local and national press that the property is now worth in excess of £150m.

Development Partners

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